Online dating bra preference

Self-presentation in the online dating environment pdf

Managing Impressions Online: Self-Presentation Processes in the Online Dating Environment,Managing Impressions Online: Self-Presentation Processes in the Online Dating Environment

Managing Impressions Online: Self-Presentation Processes in the Online Dating Environment. × Close Log In. Log in with Facebook Download Free PDF. Download Free PDF. has a true, actual, and ideal self Th. e tru e self can be defined as the inner, present version of self not fully expressed to others (Rogers ), whereas;, "th e ideal self contains those Self-esteem is defined by Rosenberg, () as "the positive or negative attitudes that a person has about himself.". In a study by Kim, Kwon and Lee (), they evaluated three Online dating sites open a new opportunity to gain insight into self presentation strategies and impression formation effects (Ellison, Heino & Gibbs, ). Although mediated matchmaking  · In this paper we analyze a unique online dating data set from a mobile application, which allows observing the user’s diversity in terms of gender and sexual orientation and their ... read more

SELF-ESTEEM IN ONLINE DATING Brenda-Cristiana BERNAD, Mona VINTILA, Otilia TUDOREL Brenda-Cristiana BERNAD, West University of Timisoara, Faculty of Sociology and Psychology, Romania brenda.

bernad98 e-uvt. ro Mona VINTILA, PhD. vintila e-uvt. ro Otilia TUDOREL, West University of Timisoara, Faculty of Sociology and Psychology, Romania otilia. tudorel e-uvt. ro Abstract The current study identifies the possible implications of using online dating platforms in terms of self-esteem and exposure to the online environment. It also wants to capture possible differences between people who use this type of platform and those who do not.

The participants in the study were , aged between 18 and 30 years. As tools, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Real Me Scale and Online Dating Inventory were used. All of these tools have been introduced into Google Forms and distributed online.

Following the study, we identified that there are differences between those who use online dating platforms and those who do not, when it comes to the level of self-esteem and the degree of self-expression in the online environment. Moreover, a link was found between the level of self-esteem and the degree of revelation of the "true self" in the virtual environment. Keywords: online dating, self-esteem Introduction Since the advances of technology and of the Internet, many aspects of our daily lives have changed.

Technology has become a part of our daily lives. This has also happened in the case of interpersonal relationships, especially around the idea of a love affair and how relationships are formed. Even in the last years, online dating platforms have significantly changed the meeting environment Finkel, com, Simultaneously, an article from the Pew Research Center pewresearch.

As it can be seen, a considerable number of Internet users also appear in the area of online dating platforms. The results of several studies reported a frequency of using online dating services.

At the same time, during the last years, the psychological characteristics that could be involved in this behaviour were researched. There are also studies based on the identification of other psychological characteristics involved in this phenomenon, such as: self-esteem Kim et al.

Also, there is an interest in identifying the reasons why these platforms are used Orosz et al. Considering the ones listed above, we can say that there is an interest in this topic and a curiosity for the motivations and psychological aspects that underlie the use of online dating services. Another important aspect regarding the realization of this paper is the lack of specialized literature of articles and studies conducted among the population of Romania on this subject.

When it comes to online dating platforms, they can be divided into two categories: online dating sites accessed from a web browser and mobile dating applications accessed over the phone or tablet. Stewart, The use of specialised terms is still quite problematic, as different specialists use different terms to speak about online dating and what exactly they understand by using these terms.

Informal language used by persons using online dating is variate, so that professionals should agree about a common language, common terms to be used in the formal professional language Goian, , , Online dating platforms offer three categories of services: access, communication and matching. Access refers to the exposure of users to potential romantic partners, but also to the opportunity to evaluate them Finke et al, User exposure is done through a profile that everyone creates.

Creating profiles is done depending on the site or application. Many of these platforms have thousands or billions of users, so online dating platforms offer access to a greater number of potential partners than in real life. Communication refers to the user's ability to use different forms of computer-mediated communication CMC to interact with potential partners before meeting them traditionally Finke et al, Matching refers to a mathematical algorithm that identifies potential partners for each user.

Self-esteem is defined by Rosenberg, as "the positive or negative attitudes that a person has about himself. The results show that people who consider romantic relationships less important and have low self-esteem are more willing to use online dating services than people with high self-esteem.

Another study by Artez and colleagues to determine the psychological characteristics that predict the use of online dating services shows that people with low self-esteem are more to use online dating platforms than those with higher self-esteem. Mehdizadeh in his study on how self-esteem and neuroticism manifest in the use of Facebook presents results that claim that people with low self-esteem are more active in using online social networks.

Similar results have been obtained by other researchers Blackhart et al. In addition, another aim of this paper is to investigate the possible differences between those who use these types of platforms and those who do not, when it comes to the level of self-esteem.

Therefore, the hypotheses underlying this study are: H1: There is a correlation between self-esteem and the use of online dating platforms. H2: There are differences between those who use online dating platforms and those who do not when it comes to self-esteem.

Methodology Design To test the hypotheses of this research, we chose a cross-sectional design. Thus, we collected data from a sample from the reference population, only once.

The reason why we chose this age range is the fact that during this period of late adolescence and the first part of the young adult stage there is a curiosity to use these platforms and to find a partner. Of the total number of participants, Of those who used these platforms, 76 people Regarding marital status: Regarding sexual orientation: It is important to note that although this study investigates the psychological factors involved in online dating platforms site or mobile applications , most respondents to this study reported the use of mobile dating applications and few uses of websites.

Research instruments To measure self-esteem, we used the Rosenberg Scale of Self-Esteem RSS M. Items 2,5,6,8 and 9 need to be recoded. The final score consists of the sum of all items and can vary between 10, which indicates a low level of self- esteem, and 40, which indicates a high level of self-esteem. To measure the use of online dating sites and online dating behaviours, we used Online Dating Inventory ODI G. Blackhart et al. The questionnaire consists of 10 questions of which only the first 9 use in the final score.

For questions 5 Which if any of the following online dating sites or dating applications have you used? For instance, one man with a doctorate included one photo of himself standing against a wall displaying his diplomas and another of him shirtless.

When asked about his choice of photos, he explained that he selected the shirtless photo because he was proud of being in shape and wanted to show it off.

To summarize, our data suggest that participants were cognizant of the online setting and its association with deceptive communication practices, and therefore worked to present themselves as credible. In doing so, they drew upon the rules they had developed for assessing others and turned these practices into guidelines for their own self-presentational messages. Discussion The primary goal of the online dating participants interviewed for this study was to find someone with whom they could establish a dating relationship although desired commitment level and type of relationship varied across participants.

Given this, they attempted to achieve their goals while contending with the unique characteristics of the online environment, engaging in strategies designed to circumvent the constraints of the online dating environment while exploiting its capacities. One constraint—the lack of nonverbal cues—meant that the task of interpreting the remaining cues became paramount in regards to both assess- ment of others and presentation of self.

Since the goal of most online dating participants was to identify and interact with potential romantic partners, indi- viduals strove to highlight their positive attributes and capitalize on the greater per- ceived control over self-presentation inherent in the medium. However, the future face-to-face interaction they anticipated meant that individuals had to balance their desire for self-promotion with their need for accurate self-presentation.

Our find- ings suggest that participants consistently engaged in creative workarounds cir- cumvention strategies as they went through the process of posting a profile, selecting individuals to contact, and communicating with potential romantic partners. Our data also highlight the recursive process by which some partic- ipants constructed rules of thumb for assessing others e.

Previous laboratory studies of SIP have tended to focus on the manipulation of a subset of cues. Exploring the question of whether participants created a playful or fantastical identity online Stone, ; Turkle, or were more open and honest Rubin, , we found that the online dating participants we spoke with claimed that they attempted to present an accurate self-representation online, a finding echoed in our survey data Gibbs et al.

This study highlights the fact that creating an accurate online representation of self in this context is a complex and evolving process in which participants attempt to attract desirable partners while contending with constraints such as those posed by technological design and the limits of self-knowledge.

In some cases, the technical constraints of the site may have unintentionally enabled acts of misrepresentation, for instance when participants slightly altered information in situations in which they felt an arbitrary data point in age, for example would significantly harm their chances of being discovered by a potential mate.

Additionally, self-reported descriptions that use subjective terms e. In the case of online dating, it may be that the default settings in the search field i. The ideal self refers to qualities or achievements one strives to possess in the future Bargh et al. In the realm of online dating, it is interesting that participants reported using the profile to ideate a version of self they desired to experience in the future.

For some, the act of constructing an online profile may begin a process of self-growth as they strive to close the gap between actual and ideal self, such as the woman who misrepresented her weight but then was able to achieve her goal of weight loss over time.

Future research is needed to assess the extent to which this phenomenon exists and its long- term consequences for processes of self-growth.

More research is also needed to understand fully whether strategies designed to circumvent constraints technical or other are perceived to be deceptive by users and, if so, which norms govern their use. Future research could work to develop a taxonomy of online deception and acceptability, which takes into account the nuances of social norms and the fact that some misrepresentation may be uninten- tional or socially accepted.

Practical Implications Given that deceptive practices are a concern for online dating participants, future research should explore the ways in which online dating sites could implement design features aimed at addressing these issues. A second design consideration is the possibility that the technical characteristics of some online dating sites may privilege objective characteristics such as demo- graphic features and de-emphasize the process of seeing others as individuals rather than as amalgams of various traits.

Participants acknowledged that the online dating environment placed more emphasis on certain kinds of information—information that might not be very important in a face-to-face setting when chemistry was already estab- lished. To compensate for or to circumvent these constraints, participants tried to create profiles that stood out or evidenced aspects of self that they were particularly proud of rather than a laundry list of features.

They struggled to present themselves as unique individuals within the constraints of a technical system that encouraged homogeneity, negotiating a desire to stand out with the need to blend in. Future research might examine the potential for developing self-presentation tools that allow individuals more nuanced ways of expressing themselves in the online envi- ronment, such as video presentations, more sophisticated communication tools, or triangulated information from others on the site.

Limitations We chose to conduct interviews with online dating participants in order to gain insight into how they perceived their experiences and the processes through which they learned to avoid the pitfalls and exploit the possibilities of online dating. However, there are several limitations that should be acknowledged in our method and sample.

Limitations of this study include the sampling of only participants located on the West Coast. While Connect. com members are worldwide, we cannot assess if regional or national differences affect the online dating experience. A major limitation is the potential for self-selection bias, as participants volunteered for the study. While demographically diverse, those that chose to volunteer might be biased toward a more positive outlook on online dating or potentially more honest in their online dating practices.

In addition, the self-reported nature of the data may have resulted in a social desirability bias, making participants less likely to admit to intentional misrepresen- tation. Finally, many of our findings may be specific to Connect. Future research could assess whether variables like self-efficacy predict which model users choose to utilize. From a historical perspective, the goals of online dating participants are not that different from those described by poets throughout the ages. What is different is the tools in their repertoire and the constraints and opportunities they present.

This study has attempted to elucidate and explain some of these social practices as a window into the ways in which new communication technologies are shaping us—and we are shaping them—in the ongoing pursuit of romantic relationships. Prior CMC research has identified similar processes in interpersonal contexts. Formal intermediaries in the marriage market: A typology and review. Baertlein, L. Demand for advice to online lovelorn is booming. What makes an online relationship successful?

Clues from couples who met in cyberspace. Can you see the real me? Journal of Social Issues, 58 1 , 33— Berger, C. Beyond initial interaction: Uncertainty, understanding and development of interpersonal relationships. Clair Eds. Baltimore: University Park Press.

Some explorations in initial interaction and beyond: Toward a developmental theory of interpersonal communication. Human Communication Research, 1 2 , 99— Berger, P.

The Social Construction of Reality: A Treatise in the Sociology of Knowledge. New York: Irvington Publishers. Bowker, N. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 8 2. html Brym, R. Love Online: A Report on Digital Dating in Canada. pdf Buller, D. Deception: Strategic and nonstrategic communication.

Wiemann Eds. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. CBC News. Online Dating Facts and Figures. html Coffey, A. Making Sense of Qualitative Data: Complementary Research Strategies. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Cornwell, B. Love on the Internet: Involvement and misrepresentation in romantic relationships in cyberspace vs.

Computers in Human Behavior, 17 2 , — DePaulo, B. Lying in everyday life. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 70 5 , — Derlega, V. Self-disclosure and relationship development: An attributional analysis. Miller Eds. Dominick, J. Who do you think you are? Personal home pages and self-presentation on the World Wide Web.

Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, 76 4 , — Donath, J. Identity and deception in the virtual community. Kollock Eds. New York: Routledge. Public displays of connection. BT Technology Journal, 22 4 , 71— Donn, J. Attitudes and practices regarding the formation of romantic relationships on the Internet.

Dutton, W. Information and Communication Technologies: Visions and Realities. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Egan, J. Love in the time of no time. The New York Times. Building theories from case study research. Academy of Management Review, 14 4 , — Fernandez, S. Getting to know you: Tell-all sites put online dater profiles to truth test. The Washington Post. html Fiore, A. Online Personals: An Overview. Paper presented at the meeting of ACM Computer-Human Interaction , Vienna, Austria.

pdf Gershberg, M. Funny odds of online dating. Self-presentation in online personals: The role of anticipated future interaction, self-disclosure, and perceived success in Internet dating. Communication Research, 33 2 , 1— Glaser, B. The Discovery of Grounded Theory: Strategies for Qualitative Research. Chicago: Aldine Publishing. Goffman, E. The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life.

New York: Anchor. Greene, K. Self-disclosure in personal relationships. Perlman Eds. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Greenspan, R. Socializing surfers shop for friends, dates. Deception and design: The impact of communication technology on lying behavior. Tscheligi Eds. New York: ACM. Higgins, E. Self-discrepancy: A theory relating self and affect. Psychological Review, 94 3 , — Hitsch, G.

What makes you click: An empirical analysis of online dating Working Paper. pdf Howard, P. Embedded media: Who we know, what we know and society online. Unitization was flexible in order to capture complete thought units. Codes were allowed to overlap Krippendorff, ; this method of assigning multiple codes to the same thought unit facilitated the process of identifying relationships between codes.

See Appendixes A and B for more information on codes. Findings These interview data offer insight into the self-presentation strategies utilized by participants in order to maximize the benefits and minimize the risks of online dating. These strategies are intimately connected to the specific characteristics of the online dating context: fewer cues, an increased ability to man- age self-presentation, and the need to establish credibility.

As suggested by SIP Walther, , subtle cues such as misspellings in the online environment are important clues to identity for CMC interactants. Many of the individuals we interviewed explicitly considered how others might interpret their profiles and carefully assessed the signals each small action or com- ment might send: I really analyzed the way I was going to present myself.

So I put that in there to sort of weed those people out. imdannyboy, Los Angeles Male Participants spoke of the ways in which they incorporated feedback from others in order to shape their self-presentational messages. In some cases, they seemed genuinely surprised by the ways in which the digital medium allowed information to leak out.

what are you doing writing me? He said: In the course of [corresponding with others on the site] I became aware of how I had to present myself. Also, I became quite aware that I had to be very brief.

I think it implied. that I was too desperate for conversation, [that] I was a hermit. joet8, Los Angeles Male The site displayed the last time a user was active on the site, and this small cue was interpreted as a reliable indicator of availability. In a self-reflexive fashion, they applied these techniques to their own presentational messages, carefully scrutinizing both cues given such as photograph and, when possible, those perceived to be given off such as grammar.

Balancing Accuracy and Desirability in Self-Presentation Almost all of our participants reported that they attempted to represent themselves accurately in their profiles and interactions. Many expressed incomprehension as to why others with a shared goal of an offline romantic relationship would intentionally misrepresent themselves. At times, their need to portray a truthful, accurate self-representation was in tension with their natural inclination to project a version of self that was attractive, successful, and desirable.

in the sense they would want this other person to like them. version of self. their ideal themselves. I think they may not have tried to lie; they just have perceived themselves differently because they write about the person they want to be. In their profile they write about their dreams as if they are reality. Christo1, Los Angeles Male In two cases, individuals admitted to representing themselves as less heavy than they actually were.

MaryMoon, Los Angeles Female In this case, a later physical change neutralized the initial discursive deception. For another participant, the profile served as an opportunity to envision and ideate a version of self that was future-focused and goal-oriented: I sort of thought about what is my ideal self.

Because when you date, you present your best foot forward. I thought about all the qualities that I have, you know, even if I sometimes make mistakes and stuff. And also got together the best picture I had, and kind of came up with what I thought my goals were at the time, because I thought that was an important thing to stress.

Marty7, Los Angeles Male Overall, participants did not see this as engaging in deceptive communication per se, but rather as presenting an idealized self or portraying personal qualities they intended to develop or enhance. In order to activate an online profile, participants had to complete a questionnaire with many closed-ended responses for descriptors such as age, body type, zip code, and income. These answers became very important because they were the variables that others used to construct searches in order to narrow the vast pool of profiles.

In fact, the front page of Connect. The structure of the search parameters encouraged some to alter information to fit into a wider range of search parameters, a circumvention behavior that guaran- teed a wider audience for their profile. They are trying to be sort of clever so that people they tend to be attracted to will actually find them. On the other hand, if I put X number of years, that is unattractive to certain people.

Everybody lies about their age or a lot of people do. So I have to cheat too in order to be on the same page as everybody else that cheats. So if I say I am 44, people think that I am It blows.

RealSweetheart, Bay Area Male In the above cases, users engaged in misrepresentation triggered by the social norms of the environment and the structure of the search filters.

The technical Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 11 — ª International Communication Association constraints of the site may have initiated a more subtle form of misrepresentation when participants were required to choose among a limited set of options, none of which described them sufficiently.

Foggy Mirror In addition to the cases in which misrepresentation was triggered by technical con- straints or the tendency to present an idealized self, participants described a third branch of unintentional misrepresentation triggered by the limits of self-knowledge. This is how they really see themselves. In explaining this phe- nomenon, KarieK used the metaphor of a mirror to emphasize the self-reflexive nature of the profile.

The difference might be overly positive which was typically the case or negative, as the below example illustrates. So I then widened my scope [in terms of search parameters] and would go off the photographs. joet8, Los Angeles Male In this case, the participant acknowledged the semantic problems that accom- pany textual self-descriptions and adopted a strategy of relying on photographs Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 11 — ª International Communication Association.

In their profiles and online interactions, they attempted to present a vision of self that was attractive, engaging, and worthy of pursuit, but realistic and honest enough that subsequent face-to-face meetings were not unpleasant or surprising. Establishing Credibility The increased ability to engage in selective self-presentation, and the absence of visual cues in the online environment, meant that accuracy of self-presentation was a salient issue for our interviewees.

In an environment in which there were limited outside confir- matory resources to draw upon, participants developed a set of rules for assessing others while incorporating these codes into their own self-presentational messages. For example, one participant made sure that her profile photograph showed her standing up because she felt that sitting or leaning poses were a camouflage technique used by heavier people. This illustrates the recursive way in which participants developed rules for assessing others e.

As one Los Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 11 — ª International Communication Association Profile photographs communicated not only what people looked like or claimed to look like , but also indicated the qualities they felt were important. For instance, one man with a doctorate included one photo of himself standing against a wall displaying his diplomas and another of him shirtless.

When asked about his choice of photos, he explained that he selected the shirtless photo because he was proud of being in shape and wanted to show it off. To summarize, our data suggest that participants were cognizant of the online setting and its association with deceptive communication practices, and therefore worked to present themselves as credible.

In doing so, they drew upon the rules they had developed for assessing others and turned these practices into guidelines for their own self-presentational messages. Discussion The primary goal of the online dating participants interviewed for this study was to find someone with whom they could establish a dating relationship although desired commitment level and type of relationship varied across participants. Given this, they attempted to achieve their goals while contending with the unique characteristics of the online environment, engaging in strategies designed to circumvent the constraints of the online dating environment while exploiting its capacities.

One constraint—the lack of nonverbal cues—meant that the task of interpreting the remaining cues became paramount in regards to both assess- ment of others and presentation of self. Since the goal of most online dating participants was to identify and interact with potential romantic partners, indi- viduals strove to highlight their positive attributes and capitalize on the greater per- ceived control over self-presentation inherent in the medium.

However, the future face-to-face interaction they anticipated meant that individuals had to balance their desire for self-promotion with their need for accurate self-presentation.

In response to the risk of misrepresentation online, made possible by the selective self-presentation affordances of CMC, participants adopted various strategies to Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 11 — ª International Communication Association. demonstrate the credibility of their identity claims, recursively applying the same techniques they employed to uncover representational ruses in others. Our find- ings suggest that participants consistently engaged in creative workarounds cir- cumvention strategies as they went through the process of posting a profile, selecting individuals to contact, and communicating with potential romantic partners.

Our data also highlight the recursive process by which some partic- ipants constructed rules of thumb for assessing others e. Previous laboratory studies of SIP have tended to focus on the manipulation of a subset of cues. Exploring the question of whether participants created a playful or fantastical identity online Stone, ; Turkle, or were more open and honest Rubin, , we found that the online dating participants we spoke with claimed that they attempted to present an accurate self-representation online, a finding echoed in our survey data Gibbs et al.

This study highlights the fact that creating an accurate online representation of self in this context is a complex and evolving process in which participants attempt to attract desirable partners while contending with constraints such as those posed by technological design and the limits of self-knowledge.

In some cases, the technical constraints of the site may have unintentionally enabled acts of misrepresentation, for instance when participants slightly altered information in situations in which they felt an arbitrary data point in age, for example would significantly harm their chances of being discovered by a potential mate.

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Need an account? Click here to sign up. Download Free PDF. Self-Esteem in Online Dating. Brenda Bernad. Continue Reading Download Free PDF. SELF-ESTEEM IN ONLINE DATING Brenda-Cristiana BERNAD, Mona VINTILA, Otilia TUDOREL Brenda-Cristiana BERNAD, West University of Timisoara, Faculty of Sociology and Psychology, Romania brenda.

bernad98 e-uvt. ro Mona VINTILA, PhD. vintila e-uvt. ro Otilia TUDOREL, West University of Timisoara, Faculty of Sociology and Psychology, Romania otilia.

tudorel e-uvt. ro Abstract The current study identifies the possible implications of using online dating platforms in terms of self-esteem and exposure to the online environment. It also wants to capture possible differences between people who use this type of platform and those who do not. The participants in the study were , aged between 18 and 30 years.

As tools, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Real Me Scale and Online Dating Inventory were used. All of these tools have been introduced into Google Forms and distributed online. Following the study, we identified that there are differences between those who use online dating platforms and those who do not, when it comes to the level of self-esteem and the degree of self-expression in the online environment.

Moreover, a link was found between the level of self-esteem and the degree of revelation of the "true self" in the virtual environment. Keywords: online dating, self-esteem Introduction Since the advances of technology and of the Internet, many aspects of our daily lives have changed. Technology has become a part of our daily lives. This has also happened in the case of interpersonal relationships, especially around the idea of a love affair and how relationships are formed.

Even in the last years, online dating platforms have significantly changed the meeting environment Finkel, com, Simultaneously, an article from the Pew Research Center pewresearch. As it can be seen, a considerable number of Internet users also appear in the area of online dating platforms. The results of several studies reported a frequency of using online dating services. At the same time, during the last years, the psychological characteristics that could be involved in this behaviour were researched.

There are also studies based on the identification of other psychological characteristics involved in this phenomenon, such as: self-esteem Kim et al.

Also, there is an interest in identifying the reasons why these platforms are used Orosz et al. Considering the ones listed above, we can say that there is an interest in this topic and a curiosity for the motivations and psychological aspects that underlie the use of online dating services. Another important aspect regarding the realization of this paper is the lack of specialized literature of articles and studies conducted among the population of Romania on this subject.

When it comes to online dating platforms, they can be divided into two categories: online dating sites accessed from a web browser and mobile dating applications accessed over the phone or tablet. Stewart, The use of specialised terms is still quite problematic, as different specialists use different terms to speak about online dating and what exactly they understand by using these terms.

Informal language used by persons using online dating is variate, so that professionals should agree about a common language, common terms to be used in the formal professional language Goian, , , Online dating platforms offer three categories of services: access, communication and matching. Access refers to the exposure of users to potential romantic partners, but also to the opportunity to evaluate them Finke et al, User exposure is done through a profile that everyone creates.

Creating profiles is done depending on the site or application. Many of these platforms have thousands or billions of users, so online dating platforms offer access to a greater number of potential partners than in real life.

Communication refers to the user's ability to use different forms of computer-mediated communication CMC to interact with potential partners before meeting them traditionally Finke et al, Matching refers to a mathematical algorithm that identifies potential partners for each user. Self-esteem is defined by Rosenberg, as "the positive or negative attitudes that a person has about himself. The results show that people who consider romantic relationships less important and have low self-esteem are more willing to use online dating services than people with high self-esteem.

Another study by Artez and colleagues to determine the psychological characteristics that predict the use of online dating services shows that people with low self-esteem are more to use online dating platforms than those with higher self-esteem.

Mehdizadeh in his study on how self-esteem and neuroticism manifest in the use of Facebook presents results that claim that people with low self-esteem are more active in using online social networks.

Similar results have been obtained by other researchers Blackhart et al. In addition, another aim of this paper is to investigate the possible differences between those who use these types of platforms and those who do not, when it comes to the level of self-esteem.

Therefore, the hypotheses underlying this study are: H1: There is a correlation between self-esteem and the use of online dating platforms. H2: There are differences between those who use online dating platforms and those who do not when it comes to self-esteem.

Methodology Design To test the hypotheses of this research, we chose a cross-sectional design. Thus, we collected data from a sample from the reference population, only once. The reason why we chose this age range is the fact that during this period of late adolescence and the first part of the young adult stage there is a curiosity to use these platforms and to find a partner.

Of the total number of participants, Of those who used these platforms, 76 people Regarding marital status: Regarding sexual orientation: It is important to note that although this study investigates the psychological factors involved in online dating platforms site or mobile applications , most respondents to this study reported the use of mobile dating applications and few uses of websites.

Research instruments To measure self-esteem, we used the Rosenberg Scale of Self-Esteem RSS M. Items 2,5,6,8 and 9 need to be recoded. The final score consists of the sum of all items and can vary between 10, which indicates a low level of self- esteem, and 40, which indicates a high level of self-esteem.

To measure the use of online dating sites and online dating behaviours, we used Online Dating Inventory ODI G. Blackhart et al. The questionnaire consists of 10 questions of which only the first 9 use in the final score. For questions 5 Which if any of the following online dating sites or dating applications have you used? This question is not scored in the final score but is for informational purposes only. In the demographic data collection section, participants were asked to provide data on gender, age, educational level, marital status, sexual and religious orientation, to what extent they attend church, and how often they use the Internet.

We also introduced a question that determined how many participants met their partner through dating sites or applications? Research procedure The tools were put together in Google Forms, and each participant completed the form online. The forms were distributed online and were open for a month, and the only eligibility criteria were the age, which had to be between 18 and 30 years. The completion of the questionnaire took approximately 15 min. Out of the total number of responses we used because some respondents did not meet the eligibility criteria.

Results For the statistical analysis of the database related to this study, we used the program SPSS Statistics V Preliminary descriptive analysis Six hundred three participants completed the study tasks.

Of the total number of participants, 12 did not fall into the age range 18—30 years and were eliminated from the statistical analysis. Thus, we reached the number of participants based on which we performed statistical analysis. H1: There is a correlation between self-esteem and the use of online dating platforms. We performed the Pearson correlation to test whether there is a correlation between self- esteem and the use of online dating platforms.

In making the correlation we used the scores from the RSS scale and all the scores from ODI. Based on this analysis, the hypothesis is not supported, but we made an additional analysis to see if there could still be a relationship between the two concepts when it comes to only those who already use these platforms.

Because what interests us is to identify a relationship between the level of self-esteem and the use of online dating platforms, we will perform the same statistical analysis, but only on the group of users of this type of platform.

Thus, we performed the Pearson correlation to test whether there is a correlation between self-esteem and the use of online dating platforms taking into account only participants who reported using such platforms.

In performing the statistical analysis, we used the RSS and ODI scores of the platform users. Following the analysis, it was identified that the stated hypothesis is not supported. Table 1: Descriptive statistics and correlation Variable N M SD 1 2 3 1. ODI RSS 3. By testing the assumptions, we noticed an extreme score on the group of those who do not use online dating platforms, which are why we eliminated the score of a participant from this analysis.

We applied the t-test for independent samples to determine if there is a difference between those who use online dating platforms and those who do not when it comes to self- esteem. According to Skovlund, E. Considering the above information, the differences between these groups are statistically significant t Tabel 3.

Self-Esteem in Online Dating,Self-Esteem in Online Dating

Thirty-four individuals active on a large online dating site participated in telephone interviews about their online dating experi- ences and perceptions. Qualitative data analysis suggests Self-esteem is defined by Rosenberg, () as "the positive or negative attitudes that a person has about himself.". In a study by Kim, Kwon and Lee (), they evaluated three Online dating sites open a new opportunity to gain insight into self presentation strategies and impression formation effects (Ellison, Heino & Gibbs, ). Although mediated matchmaking  · In this paper we analyze a unique online dating data set from a mobile application, which allows observing the user’s diversity in terms of gender and sexual orientation and their Managing Impressions Online: Self-Presentation Processes in the Online Dating Environment. × Close Log In. Log in with Facebook Download Free PDF. Download Free PDF. has a true, actual, and ideal self Th. e tru e self can be defined as the inner, present version of self not fully expressed to others (Rogers ), whereas;, "th e ideal self contains those ... read more

Self-disclosure in computer-mediated communication: The role of self-awareness and visual anonymity. Online love may come with safety warning. This paper brings new information about users of online dating platforms in Romania. version of self. constraints of the site may have initiated a more subtle form of misrepresentation when participants were required to choose among a limited set of options, none of which described them sufficiently. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 3 1 , 43—

The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life. Kibby, M. Online Dating and Females in the Academia: Is it an Issue for Commendation, Condemnation or Ambivalence? MacKinnon, R. Interviews were semistructured to ensure that all partic- ipants were asked certain questions and to encourage participants to raise other issues they felt were relevant to the research. Because our sample included only 8.

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